Thoughts of #Peace | TINA FRISCO

Share and care

 

In light of the discord going on in many parts of the world, I wanted to share this most enlightening and thought provoking post by my wise and compassionate friend, who I like to think of as the ‘voice of reason’, Tina Frisco.

 

“We are what we think” – Tina Frisco

 

Photo by Terri Webster Schrandt
Image courtesy of Terri Webster Schrandt

Our thoughts and prayers are with
our sisters and brothers in London ❤

 

The hatred evidenced by terrorist attacks around the world could easily be met with equal hatred, should we allow it. But how would that identify and inform us as a species? What would that do to the hearts and minds of individuals as well as society? What do we want to teach our children, and what kind of world do we want to leave them?

 

It is a challenge to keep our hearts open amid such unconscionable acts of violence. Yet it is our only hope of survival. Meeting these despicable acts with an equal amount of aggression could lead to our annihilation in this nuclear age. At the very least, it could alter our consciences and consciousness to a degree beyond repair. And that is as unacceptable as the terrorist act itself.

 

Fire cannot be fought with fire. We know this. Yet our species persists in its futile attempt to meet hatred with hatred, aggression with aggression, terror with terror. However, hope is skirting the horizon ~ fragile in its element but tenacious in its intent. Whether or not it will rise with tomorrow’s sun will be determined by our actions today.

 

I’m reminded of Dorothy Bryant’s book, The Kin of Ata Are Waiting for You. The village folk circle a woman being raped. They neither interfere nor intervene but simply stand in witness of this heinous act. The perpetrator not only cannot continue, but also comes face to face with his salacious fear. When he realizes he has been forgiven, his heart opens and he is transformed.

 

The Kin of Ata by Dorothy Bryant

Some might call this a miracle. Yet if we consider the collective unconscious, we might see this in a different light. Instead of intervention from an outside source ~ no matter how beneficent the being ~ we realize it is a manifestation of our unified thought. We are what we think, and energy follows in kind.

 

Although I was raised Roman Catholic, I follow an eclectic spiritual path. I hold the avatars and bodhisattvas in my heart, and one in particular now comes to mind: Jesus Christ. Regardless of whether history is to be believed, the story of Jesus’ passion sets an example that sorely needs to be remembered, if not emulated. “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.”
If we understand that all negative emotions and behavior originate from fear, we might be more inclined to err on the side of compassion. . . . Continue Reading

 

Source: Thoughts of #Peace | TINA FRISCO

Guest Featured Author – John Maberry – The Fountain

Featured author of the week

 

Today I’m thrilled to have over a dear friend and prolific writer, blogger, and author John Maberry, to talk about his writing and his newest book – The Fountain – Karma Can be Painful. Seven short stories in fantasy and Sci-Fi genres to captivate your imagination.

 

Fountain by John Maberry

 

John is also the author of Waiting for Westmoreland, his memoir about growing up in poverty and surviving the Viet Nam war. I loved that book and you can read my review of it HERE. John refers to himself as a ‘lapsed lawyer’ and also formerly worked for the government.

 Waiting for Westmoreland - John Maberry

 

John also runs two blogs –  Johnswriting.com  which is an eclectic blog where he shares pieces of his work, essays, humor and whatever else may be on his mind as well as Eaglepeakpress.com where that blog is set up as a quarterly magazine hosting a wealth of information from writers articles to current world topics such as: art, music, advice for living, Buddhism, book reviews and so much more. John also runs a Writer’s Hangout group on Linkedin. I like to refer to John as one with a great mind, wise and scholarly and a good sense of humor. So if you’re interested in all things pertaining to life, humanity, writing, or world peace, you may want to sign up for John’s quarterly E-magazine. 

John Maberry author

About John:  That’s me, formally attired, a rare event even before retirement.  We (the wife and I) relocated from our home in Northern Virginia–with its traffic, noise, heat and humidity–to the scenic hills of New Mexico in 2011. After settling into our dream house high atop a hill, in 2013, we have returned to our third age pursuits–quilting for her and writing for me. I had a dream of being a writer since second grade.

Procrastinator that I am, it took until retirement from that day job to really get moving on that dream. So now I can honestly call myself a writer. I am also a lapsed lawyer, a former government employee, a father of two and a 30+ year (in this lifetime) Bodhisattva of the Earth. I’m also a happy man and a funny guy (strange/weird my wife says).

 

Note: Let me save you the trouble of looking up the word Bodhisattva . The meaning, according to Dictionary,com  

Word Origin:  Noun – Buddhism

person who has attained prajna, or Enlightenment, but whopostpones Nirvana in order to help others to attain Enlightenment:individual Bodhisattvas are the subjects of devotion in certain sectsand are often represented in painting and sculpture.”

 

Now that we’ve learned a little about John, let’s get to know more about his thoughts and writing:

 

Can you share a little bit with us about what inspired you to become a Buddhist?

 

My illusions were shattered and innocence lost spending a year in Vietnam (1967/1968), protesting the war and living through Watergate. I went on a quest to discover how to make the world a better place. Not surprisingly after years of college and professional school, I finally learned that I needed to change myself to change the world.

 

I was lazy, a procrastinator and indecisive. I met a woman who had  dynamic energy and powerful life condition. I wanted to know why. She  took me to a meeting where I saw and heard people with hope and determination. They had what I was looking for. Books on Buddhism confirmed it. In a few months I started practicing and never doubted its value. It’s been 40 years now!

 

I’ve read you’re captivating memoir, Waiting for Westmoreland. Could you please share with us what it was that spurred you to want to give up law after everything you survived in life and finally became a lawyer?

 

Lots of reasons. If you ever saw the movie the Paper Chase, you’d understand. Many lawyers, not all, are arrogant a**holes. I need not have been one, but that’s who I would have been associating with. The law firm I had clerked at did incredibly boring administrative law AND they didn’t offer me a job. I didn’t get even get an interview at some Federal agencies I would have happily worked for. While I easily passed the bar on the first try, the challenge of “hanging out a shingle” didn’t seem a financially sensible option. Besides the fiscal uncertainty, it seemed unlikely to offer the time to be a writer. There are few part-time lawyers. J

 

Please tell us how you came up with the idea of turning your Eagle Peak Press blog into a quarterly magazine.

 

I self-published my memoir, Waiting for Westmoreland, in 2007. I managed to snag Eagle Peak Press both as a publisher name and later as a website domain. Note that I said the site came afterwards. Not what you’re supposed to do! Sometime later, rather than simply maintaining the façade of a small publisher, I decided that I should at least reach out to readers, in between books, with a quarterly magazine. Keeps my hand in on nonfiction pieces—which my local government career featured.

 

What sparked you to jump from memoir to writing short fiction?

 

I just had to write the memoir first. It chronicled my life and how I’d come to be a Buddhist—the strange tapestry of time and causation that wove through problems with people in authority, a year in Vietnam and a prospective father-in-law that wanted to kill me.

 

I’d always wanted to be a writer, from the second grade when a teacher sent a short story of mine to the Scholastic. I got my first rejection slip way back then. 🙂

 

I couldn’t be a starving writer, having lived through poverty. I needed a job. Then I needed writing time. Retirement gave me that and a secure income. I wanted to write a novel soon after the memoir. Things got in the way. I got impatient so I put out the short stories. I think that will work out for the best. A sci-fi novel is coming next year. 🙂

 

I’ve read your new book, The Fountain. It was a wonderful read keeping me intrigued till the end of each story with your signature twisted endings. The stories, although fiction/fantasy, all had some element of human error such as greed, self-doubt or mystery of the unknown. What prompted the ideas of these stories? Was anything in these stories taken from your own life’s experience?

 

Some came from unknown resources of the mind. Others were influenced by places and events. I’ve always like twists and humor, so they play a part in several. I love George Carlin, Ray Bradbury and O’Henry among others.

 

  • The Twilight Zone, Rod Serling’s TV show from long ago, and the books of Carlos Castaneda inspired the lead story, “The Fountain.

  • Vampire stories and a common digestive problem (my wife has it) brought “Alfred’s Strange Blood Disorder.”

  • My daughter had a Golden Retriever. It had no special talents other than an amazing flexibility in doing a back dance accompanied by unusual moans and other sounds. That and a wandering mind led to “Lily, an Amazing Dog.”

  • We’ve been to the Maine coast a couple of times. That provided the setting for “The Closet Door.” Outer Banks vacations suggested a setting for “The Flame.” Obviously, occasional writers block played a part in that story.

  • The rest is all imagination, except for “The Fribble,” which some might notice rhymes with a critter that caused problems on the Starship Enterprise. Trekkies know all about that.

 

Please share with my readers a little about The Fountain, we’d love to read an excerpt from one of the stories.

 

Here’s an excerpt from the opening of “Lily, an Amazing Dog.”

 

The first incident came on a morning walk past the retirement home, along a tree-lined boulevard. A flash of sun off a sliding glass door across the street caught Roger’s eye. A lady in a green dress stepped through the door onto her fifth floor balcony. She smiled and waved, seeing Lily with her plushy frog. It’s a retriever thing—Goldens can go nowhere without carrying something in their mouth. The matron began watering a potted ficus. He looked away momentarily.

 

A loud sound of rending metal drew his attention back to the building. With silver hair streaming and dress flapping like a flag in a stiff wind, the woman plunged from the collapsing balcony. Lily barked at the sight, dropping her frog. In that brief moment, a shimmer appeared in the air. The woman disappeared into the flickering space, never hitting the ground. Lily barked again, before picking up her frog and moving on with the walk as if nothing out of the ordinary had occurred.

 

Thank you John, for taking the time to visit with us here today. As you know I’m a big fan of your writing and look forward to reading your future work.

 

Follow John and Connect with him:

 

Blog     Eagle Peak Press

 

Goodreads

 

Linked In     Google+   John Maberry’s Writings

 

Visit John’s Amazon author page

 

#BookReview – P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye #Memoir #Narcissism | deborahjay

D.G. Kaye's books

I was pleasantly surprised to find that friend and author Deborah Jay had read my latest book, P.S. I Forgive You. But I was more touched by the heartfelt review she wrote for the book.

 

Deb’s review taught me that my story not only resonates with readers who have and are living similar situations with struggling to understand and forgive their loved ones, but also reminds more fortunate readers who haven’t been subjected to emotional abuse by a parent about how blessed they are to not have had to endure such relationships. Read Deb’s review below:

 

#BOOKREVIEW – P.S. I FORGIVE YOU – A BROKEN LEGACY BY D.G. KAYE #MEMOIR #NARCISSISM

On the eve of my father’s funeral, I find myself writing my review of this memoir with a real sense of gratitude that I was lucky enough to have loving parents, and little dysfunctionality in my family. My father was raised in a rather Victorian household, (he was born in 1915), where children were seen but not heard, which made him always a quiet man, but no less loving for it, though he rarely expressed emotion.

Tomorrow I shall say goodbye to him in the knowledge that he lived a long and satisfied life, leaving no regrets at the end on any of our parts, unlike my poor friend Debby Gies (author D.G. Kaye), who suffered a traumatic childhood.

Thanks, Debby. Whilst I sorrow for your travails, you’ve gifted me with a great contrast to recognise at this sad time how fortunate I have been.

P.S. I Forgive You on Amazon

P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken LegacyP.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I found Kaye’s first book about her narcissistic mother a true eye-opener, an education about a condition I’d heard of, but never understood in all its desperately sad reality. I have since realised that I know someone with this condition, and it helps me to understand her often bizarre decisions and behaviour, rather than just being confused by them.

This sequel book, which also stands alone as an education of a different kind, is a raw and open story of how to deal with the guilt that comes from finally saying “I have had enough!” and sticking with that decision to the bitter end.

As a work of self-help, which is many respects it is, this book is a good guide to dealing with those relationships that just cannot be fixed, Continue Reading . . .

 

 

 

 

 

Source: #BookReview – P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye #Memoir #Narcissism | deborahjay

The Other Inconspicuous Form of Bullying – Emotional Bullying

 

Emotional Bullying

 

We’ve all heard stories about bullying, It happens in homes, schools, and on the internet. But what about a form of bullying in our every day lives we may be experiencing ? Often these symptoms aren’t recognized or more often, not even considered a form of bullying.

 

This often deceptive hidden form of bullying can occur through the way some people interact with friends or loved ones. When people talk down to others, making them feel insignificant, threatened or forced to abide by what is being directed at them, that is bullying.

 

Is there anyone in your life that responds to a heartfelt request from you with assertion or aggression demanding their way is better and all negotiations are off the table? Do you have someone in your circles who calls all the shots when it comes to making plans and out of a sense of not wanting to stir conflict you pacify their demands just to keep the peace? That’s bullying too. Why do we continue to remain in the circles of these confrontational, demanding people? Is it because we’re intimidated by them, don’t want to create waves in our relationships with them or are we just accustomed to the relationship as it is?

 

I can certainly attest to having being a subject of some of these somewhat toxic relationships in my own life. The people who make the plans, not wanting feedback but expecting everyone in the group to comply is a common factor in many relationships. There always seems be one of those leader types who wants to lead the pack by their decisions without debate. It’s easy to fall prey to these people especially if we are compassionate or sensitive souls who don’t wish to challenge directives with countering suggestions of our own. These types of relationships are not healthy. Whether we are easily intimidated or just wishing to keep the peace, we have to discover methods which allow us to stand up for our own thoughts or at the very least make changes to slowly distance ourselves from these dominating personality types.

 

So how do we handle these dominating people in our lives? First, it’s important to stand up and feel confident about what we would like to request. It’s perfectly okay to state our opinions and make alternate suggestions if we disagree or feel we have something better to suggest. If our ideas are shot down, we need to ask why. Perhaps we’ll discover that our suggestion may not have been the best idea, but with posing the question and stimulating a discussion we at least get to weigh out options. On the other hand, if the person we’re trying to have this discussion with is adamant that her decision is final and there’s nothing to discuss and this is the ongoing pattern with her then it’s time to re-evaluate the relationship.

 

In healthy friendships and relationships, we should be able to have a good two-way conversation with each other. But if we find we are constantly being shot down for our ideas and what we say never seems to be taken into consideration by these people then these aren’t the people we need to have in our circles. Granted, when it comes to family relations it is more difficult to sever ties sometimes, but that doesn’t mean we have to socialize with these people. And in the event we are forced to congregate at a family function, it may be best to just keep our opinions zipped if it’s going to cause chaos within the family unless of course, we’ve had our fill of ongoing confrontations, then it may be time to exit.

 

But when it comes to friendships and acquaintances, we do have a choice. We don’t have to be rude, but we can state our opinions, explain why we feel a certain way and try to open up a dialogue to make our points. If the person we are conversing with isn’t open to opinions on a constant basis, it may be time to take that exit walk. This also applies to those energy suckers we tend to collect in our lives. These are the people who have nothing to give of themselves – a compliment, an ear to listen or any interest in how we are feeling. We can’t always change people but we have the power to change ourselves and realize when people around us aren’t offering anything positive to our lives we need to shed them.

 

We all have the freedom of speech. But that doesn’t give people rights to dominate other people’s thoughts or lives. Respect is essential in all relationships in order for them to be healthy ones. Knocking people’s ideas and thoughts and making them feel inferior is just one more form of emotional bullying. If we treat people and their opinions with respect, we should expect it in return. And if we’re not getting it after discussing the issue with them it’s a good indicator that it’s time to move on.

 

This post was chosen as the weekly feature winner at the Blogger’s Pit Stop!

Blogger's Pit Stop feature winner

 

Sunday Book Review – Hinting at Shadows by Sarah Brentyn

Book reviews by D.G. Kaye

Today’s book review is on Sarah Brentyn’sHinting at Shadows. Admittedly, I don’t write flash fiction myself, but because I enjoy this author’s writing I was tempted to check out her book and I’m glad I did.  I enjoyed it very much because of the subject matter which although fiction, was a compelling read because the messages left from each story were relatable to real life issues.

 

Hinting at Shadows - Sarah Brentyn

 

Buy This Book on Amazon!

Blurb:

 

No One Escapes Life Unscathed

Delve into the deeper reaches of the human condition and the darkness that lives there.

A girl haunted by her sister’s drowning. A boy desperate for his father’s affection. A woman forced to make a devastating decision. A man trapped by his obsessions.

Experience tales of love, loss, murder, and madness through this collection of flash and micro fiction.

Take a peek behind the smile of a stranger. Get a glimpse inside the heart of a friend. Scratch the surface and discover what is hidden beneath.

These stories will open your mind, tug at your thoughts, and allow you to explore the possibility that, even in the brightest moments, something is Hinting at Shadows.

Each selection is approximately 100 words, with a bonus section of Microbursts in which each story is told in 50 words or less.

 

My 5 Star Review:

 

Sarah Brentyn is a master at micro-fiction. Her stories written in short 100 words or less don’t require more words, but leave us in deep contemplation. The power of words in small micro-bursts have the ability to reveal a whole story open to the reader’s interpretation.

 

All Brentyn’s stories reveal a human element reflecting many emotions from fear, abuse, trust, passion, hope and more.

 

Just a sampling here will demonstrate that although short, this book will give a reader reason to pause and digest these bite-sized chunks of life:

 

They said, “if you talk about it, it will set you free.” She told them. They locked her up.

Eventually we learned that his rage was preferable when he lashed out. His silence meant a storm grew within him. And we would pay.

The doctors say insomnia and prescription pills. I say “writer” and pick up a pen.’

 

Hinting at Shadows is a wonderful, thought-provoking, psychological read about the human condition.

 

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#BookRelease – Plateau: Beyond the Trees | TINA FRISCO

 

Today I’m happy to reblog my dear friend Tina Frisco’s post about the FREE promo she is running.

 

Tina has been through all sorts of hoops trying to regain her first book, Plateau, back from the original publisher. She waited until her contract was up to claim it back and found that they still wanted to charge her an exorbitant amount of money to have her book back, but I helped her come up with a plan to get it back free and it worked. I’m not going into details but suffice it to say. she had a lot of work to do after, reformatting and editing and today her book is back on Amazon as the author and publisher and in honor of that she is offering the book FREE! 

 

If you haven’t read this amazing book, here’s your chance to grab it now! I wrote a review on this book last year that you can read HERE. Please read the heartfelt post Tina has written to share her newly published book below.

 

#BOOKRELEASE – PLATEAU: BEYOND THE TREES

I am pleased to announce the release of the 2nd edition of my first novel, PLATEAU.
Plateau: Beyond the Trees by Tina FriscoAvailable in both eBook and paper.

They will show in the Amazon store within 3-5 business days but are available now through the Kindle and CreateSpace stores. The old version is still showing on Amazon but will be removed.

 

To celebrate, the eBook will be free to download from the 15th through the 19th.

Download it HERE.

I’m so grateful to have this task behind me! It took quite a bit longer than I expected, largely due to how poorly I wrote five years ago compared with now. I decided to give the book a quick overhaul, forgetting it was not a vehicle that merely needed an oil change. And once I started, there was no turning back. I did all the formatting, which can be a nightmare. But I learned a lot when I published my book Vampyrie last December, and fortunately I remembered most of it.

 

I also needed to make a cover. On the front I wanted to use the same image, which was created by a friend of mine and was easy to upload. I used GIMP  to apply the text. Since CreateSpace’s cover design choices are limited, the back cover was more of a challenge. How to get the color I wanted? I was blessed with a light-bulb moment. I scanned a sheet of white paper into my computer, uploaded the image into GIMP, applied color, and added the text. This project was a full day’s work. When I uploaded it to CreateSpace, it looked fine. But CS said the text went too far to the border (even though it was within the border shown), so I had to redo the text, which took another half day. (I need to go to GIMP school.)

 

During all of this, my mum became seriously ill and had to be hospitalized. I thought I might have to hop a train and travel cross country. Thankfully she recovered and is doing well.

 

Now that the dreaded book business is completed (I need to go to formatting school), I can resume writing posts and visiting blogs. I can tackle that collapsing pile of books on my TBR. I can open the stack of mail on my desk.  Maybe I’ll get around to cleaning and doing the laundry. My neglected little car needs a bath, and I really should jump in the shower. Wash my hair? Yes, I need to do that as well. I even hope to go out to dinner or the movies before the end of the year. An author’s work is never done.   Please continue reading . . .

 

 

Leave a Review

 

Source: #BookRelease – Plateau: Beyond the Trees | TINA FRISCO

Author Profile: 20 Questions (more or less) With Sally Cronin | Dan Alatorre – AUTHOR

Reblog and featuring

 

In keeping with my Friday Guest Author theme, today I want to share a wonderful interview Dan Alatorre had with Sally Cronin.

 

I like to keep Friday’s focused on author interviews and for the next while I’m committing to conducting two interviews per month until my next book is finished, instead of weekly, as they involve quite a bit of time to organize and I don’t have the luxury of time on my side at the moment. But in between my bi-monthly interviews I will be having guest authors post here, like Christy Birmingham’s post last week, as well as sharing other author spotlights from some other wonderful interviews.

 

Many of us know the talented Sally Cronin, but it seems whenever she guest appears on yet another interview, there’s always something new and fascinating to learn about her. So please enjoy this wonderfully entertaining 20 Question interview with Sally with Dan.

 

Author Profile: 20 Questions (more or less) With Sally Cronin

danOccasionally on the blog we will talk with one of our author friends, gaining valuable insights into their behind-the-scenes world.

Today we meet with Sally Cronin, a brilliant writer and friend of the blog.

Be ready for a few surprises!

After working in a number of industries for over 25 years, Sally decided that she wanted to pursue a completely different career, one that she had always been fascinated with. “I began studying Nutrition and the human body twenty years ago and I opened my first diet advisory centre in Ireland in 1998. Over the last 18 years I have practiced in Ireland and the UK as well as written columns, articles and radio programmes on health and nutrition. I published my first book with a Canadian self-publisher in the late 90s and since then have republished that book and released nine others as part of our own self-publishing company. Apart from health I also enjoy writing fiction in the form of novels and short stories and you can find me daily on my blog Smorgasbord Invitation.”

See? I told you there’d be surprises. And there are more.

Here’s Sally

.

sally wedding day 1980
author Sally Cronin

Sally: Thank you so much Dan for inviting me over.

Dan: Sure. Let’s get right to the important stuff. What kind of Chinese food do you order all the time?

That would be crispy duck and pancakes, and I have indulged in this starter all around the world, and rarely been disappointed. If I was off to a desert Island with just three dishes this would be number one… If you are interested, that would be followed by Beef Wellington and then Baked Alaska. If I am off to a desert Island on my own you can forget healthy eating!

 

I do love me some beef Wellington. Which is the more important of these two: write drunk, edit sober? 

Definitely edit sober… Preferably with an automatic translator from drivel to English!  However, writing drunk has its merits although it can result in some emotional outbursts.

 

Why do some authors sell well and others don’t? (Indie or otherwise, but indie if possible)

There are a number of key elements involved when it comes to selling well as an Indie author in my view, and I am still working on getting it right myself.

  • Quality of the writing,
  • Well formatted and easy to read.
  • Strong storyline or subject matter.
  • Popular Genre or wide based subject matter.
  • Opinions of satisfied customers.

Which mean very little without the following elements.

Online presence – People do buy people first, and if they cannot find out about you they are less likely to buy your book. In this day and age not having some form of platform as an author will not help with sales.

Marketing – the common approach seems to be a book tour launch over a couple of weeks with exactly the same format. This is a shotgun approach especially as most of the blogs hosting the tour are within the same community. Readers after seeing the first post, are not going to respond to any that follow.

A different approach, which I have found more productive, is to

set up a series of interviews spread over 8 to 10 weeks split between those contacts you regularly communicate with, and blogs that are outside the community.

Also, as interviews tend to have different questions each is unique, and you can introduce individual key elements each time about your book.

Also – for both non-fiction books and fiction genres there are groups online to market specifically. For example…. If you have written a book ‘How to self-publish your Novel’, the first thing you should do is create a list of all the writing groups that have an online presence, and drop them a line with the book blurb, your latest review and a link to buy. Your market is not all the authors who already follow you on your blog and social media, but all the aspiring authors out there who are terrified of the process!

Writing books in a series is also key. I have a number of authors on my shelves today that I continue to buy and read year after year. One of the key links between them is that they write series of books. Wilbur Smith (I bought his first book 53 years ago and every one since), Bernard Cornwell, Jean M Auel, Lee Child and a newer author Gregg Hurwitz, to name just a few. Not only is the writing wonderful, but I am invested in their various lead characters and automatically want to find out what happens to them.

As Indies we need to emulate these successful and best-selling authors, and whilst we might not have multi-million pound advertising budgets, we do have access to the worldwide web to market ourselves. It takes time, sometimes years, but readers are not lining up outside our doors to buy our books. They are sitting in front of a virtual bookstore with millions of titles looking for one that stands out from the masses.

sgc-book-covers-10x1

I could not agree more. Besides writing, what are your favorite things to do?

I am into the 3Ms… Music, Movies and Martinis… Sorry but 2Ms did not sound right! . . . Please continue reading 

 

 

Source: Author Profile: 20 Questions (more or less) With Sally Cronin | Dan Alatorre – AUTHOR

Aging and Wisdom – The New Perennial Age of Women

Perennial years

 

 

 

How many times have we said we don’t feel or look our age? When did middle-age sneak into our lives? Where did the years go?

I’m sure we’ve all begged the answers to those questions once or twice as we women approach our ‘Perennial’ years.

 

What comes to mind when women use the terms ‘the new 40 or 50′, even 60 or 70? Here’s a clue:  it encompasses so much more than just looks.

 

In my opinion, looks have changed since the last generation, without discounting so many other changes that have occurred through the decades to empower women. Women in their 40s and 50s look much younger than those from decades past. I’m not referring to the advent of cosmetic surgery, but when I look back on decades past, I notice some interesting hairdos and fashion statements.  Looking back at the women in my own family and even movie stars with the styles of yesteryear, it’s not hard for me to compare a woman of today in her 40s or 50s appearing younger looking than those before us at the same age. Was it the hairstyles, a more sedentary lifestyle which gave the impression a women in her 30s back when of 30 or 40 years ago looked similar in age to women now in their 40s or 50s?

 

Back in those days, women didn’t lead lifestyles like they do now, some with powerful jobs, being the bigger bread winner, many working what used to be considered, jobs for only men, or raising a family while carrying a job. “We’ve come a long way baby,” as the old cigarette ad used to say. (Am I giving away my age?)

 

I have to laugh at the many times me and my sister would bring up the subject of our dreaded childhood weekends we were forced to spend at our paternal grandparents’ house. We’d remark to one another about how even when we were small, our grandmother looked like . . . well, a grandmother. We only envision her old from as far back as we can remember. But lol, I digress.

 

What made me write this post on women then and now was prompted by a conversation I had on the weekend with one of my sister-in-laws. She shared a topic of discussion that came up between her and her yoga teacher. Her teacher had referred to women in the age group of 40s and 50s as ‘perennials’. Have any of you heard this term used before? I haven’t. But I love it.

 

I’ve heard of some more unflattering terms such as menopausal, even cougars, but not perennials.

 

According to the yoga teacher’s preferred term, perennial, it represents this age category because many women are reaching their full potential, ‘in full bloom’ as they enter their 40s and 50s. This age bracket is where many women enter new phases of life such as: the empty nest stage where their kids are finally moving out or getting married, making new lives for themselves or raising families. This is a time where women begin to re-evaluate their accomplishments and desires and come to realize they want to do things that either they may not have thought about doing when they were younger, or were too busy raising their families or building careers, choosing to put their own desires on hold.

 

I can identify with this wonderful choice of word, perennial, representing a time period of continuation of our evolving. We are still evolving and learning and doing. Every year we bloom with more knowledge from our experiences and eventually, the new bloom leads to desires of the ‘me time’. A time for us to focus on the things we enjoy whether it be travel, new hobbies, furthering our education, or even writing books.

 

So much can apply to this ‘new age’. The possibilities are endless if we allow ourselves the entitlement to flourish and bloom to complete ourselves for ourselves.

 

I absolutely adore the term ‘perennial’ and it does sound so much better than ‘the change’. In fact, there may even be a book from me down the road on the subject.

 

How do you feel about the term ‘perennial’?

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