Writer’s Tips – #NovelWriting, #Blogs to #Podcast, Making #Videos with #Canva and More!

 

This edition of Writer’s Tips is chock full of great posts from fellow writers on everything related to writing stories. Also included are two fantastic ‘how to’ posts on how to turn our blog posts into podcasts, and how to create videos by using Canva.

 

How to write the best titles for blog posts that attract attention from the SEO machines by Hugh Roberts

https://hughsviewsandnews.com/2021/01/25/how-to-write-the-perfect-titles-for-all-your-blog-posts-bloggingtips/comment-page-1/?unapproved=109549&moderation-hash=e4c0f7a18b013af7e07b8976de63d66e#comment-109549

 

How to make your novel standout in a crowd of books by Deborah Jay

https://deborahjayauthor.com/2021/02/01/how-do-you-make-your-novel-stand-out-from-the-crowd-bookmarketing/comment-page-1/#comment-35182

 

7 Easy tips to craft a story – Nicholas Rossis

https://nicholasrossis.me/2021/02/05/7-easy-tips-to-craft-the-perfect-story/#comment-253640

 

How to make a video with Canva, by Harmony Kent at the Story Empire

https://storyempirecom.wordpress.com/2021/02/05/how-to-make-a-video-using-canva/comment-page-1/#comment-133096

 

Jan Sykes shared a fabulous, informative post on WordPress’s capability to turn out blogs into podcasts!

https://jansikesblog.com/2021/03/05/a-new-wordpress-discovery-anchor-podcasts/comment-page-1/#comment-157053

 

Five Common Beginning Writer Storyteller Mistakes by Anne R. Allen

Five Common Beginning Writer Storytelling Mistakes

 

©DGKaye2021

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The Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

The Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic

Carrot Ranch is running a parade of fun challenges to take part in the Sue Vincent Rodeo. You can enter by writing a Flash Fiction entry, reblogging any of Sue’s beautiful posts or buying and reviewing her books. See the details below. I recently reviewed Sue’s beautiful guided journey of meditations in Petals of the Rose, you can read my review here.

 

Today, I’m also sharing a beautiful poem written by Sue. Please read how to join in the fun below the poem.

 

 

To leave no place for regret in a life
Save only mistakes from which to learn
Letting error serve good purpose
Redeeming remorse for hurt
Carelessly committed
Youthful folly wakes
To see itself
Mirrored eyes
Reflect
Pain
Joy
Growing
Unfolding
Other choices
From a deeper well
Embracing each moment
A gift of living presence
Harmony of body and soul
Accepting human imperfections
Part of the blueprint for the journey home

 

 

Here at the Carrot Ranch, we take the business of 99-word literary art seriously. Those who participate in the Ranch prompts or yearly Rodeo saddle up to TUFF (The Ultimate Flash Fiction) it out and train new Rough Riders as we go. Now, the Ranch is hosting a new event to sharpen minds, welcome new hands, and celebrate one of our own the best way we know how: our first ever Rodeo Classic.

In this Rodeo Classic, we’re here to celebrate a stalwart center of many blogging corners, Sue Vincent. Sue has variously contributed to the community here at the Carrot Ranch, through communication with many other bloggers, and run her own famous #writephoto weekly blog prompt. You can (and should!) follow her on her blogs, The Daily Echo and the shared blog France & Vincent. She has inspired us to become better writers and shown us the power of mystery and myth. We also suggest taking a perusal at her book corral and Amazon pages!

 

The Rodeo and Prizes

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic serves as a special challenge. Riders will have to condense the following photo into a story of 99 words (or, if you prefer, a poem of 99 syllables). Writing 99 words has never seemed TUFFer!

 

 

Each story needs to have a beginning, middle and end. Poems must have distinctive theme, movement, and rhythm; no rhyme scheme is necessary, but neither will rhyme be punished. Go where the prompt leads you – any genre is acceptable, but keep it family friendly and related to the photo. If you haven’t wrangled here at the Carrot Ranch before, you can find some prize-winning 99-word flash from the 2020 Rodeo or the 2019 Rodeo at these links. Don’t cheat with 98 or 100 words or syllables! We’ll only accept 99 word stories or 99 syllable poems written in English! (We’ll be using https://wordcounter.net/ to count words and https://syllablecounter.net/ to count syllables so everyone has the same standard). Only write 99 word stories. Do not write 99 word poems – we want 99 syllable poems.

For this rodeo, we’re offering a $100 grand prize. Five runners up will each receive one paperback from Sue Vincent’s collection of published books (those who live in a region where the paperback is unavailable may receive an e-book instead). No fee necessary to enter but this is a fundraiser so we kindly ask for a suggested donation of $5 per entry (no more than two entries allowed per writer). The contest will close at midnight on Friday, February 19th, 2021. Winning entries will be announced and read at CarrotRanch.com/blog on March 22, 2021. Top entries published at Carrot Ranch. We will not accept entries previously published (even if published on your own blog), so keep them tucked away for now.

Please continue reading at the Carrot Ranch for details on submissions.

 

Source: The Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

 

©DGKaye2021

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Let’s Have a Look – About #Writing – Writing Fiction vs. Nonfiction

 

Welcome to my new series in this new year. I decided to call it – Let’s Have a Look. #LetsHaveALook

 

So what exactly will we be having a look at? How do I describe this? Random topics or incidence I come across in daily life – from reading or watching the news, to a blog I may have read that gives me pause, are things I’ll be looking at. A spontaneous thought if triggered about a why or that raises a question to myself – I’m going to bring discussion to the event or article here.

 

So, Let’s Have a Look!

 

Today’s post came about inspired by a reply from my author friend, #fantasy writer, Diana Peach, who mentioned in reply to my comment I’d left on her recent post, when she shared about how one of her characters in her WIP sometimes directs where the story leads.

I had commented that I have enough trouble writing nonfiction about real people – implying that I could only imagine all that is involved in the creating of characters and fantasy storylines and Diana responded with this:

 

“Part of me thinks it would be harder to write real people, Debby, because a non-fiction author is writing from a particular perspective as well as making interpretations about others, all the while trying to represent the truth. It’s easier to just make everything up! Lol. A post from you about how you navigate that would be really interesting.”

 

***

Okay Diana, here’s the post!

Well yes, Diana brought up a good question in her reply, and prompted me to respond with a post about perspective and truth when writing nonfiction as opposed to creating fictional characters – whom often hold many real truths within their characters as well. Is it harder writing about real people? Let’s have a look.

Okay, I thought it would be fun to look at our differing perspectives on difficulty differences between writing in fiction or nonfiction. Diana claims it’s easier to write fiction (in gest?) because, she claims ‘it’s easier to make stuff up’. But in my opinion, I think writing in every specific genre brings its challenges.

As Diana claims, writing nonfiction entails finding the right perspective, while interpreting what we believe to be our truth. That’s what nonfiction writing is in essence, but there are other conditions to take in consideration as well:

  • The subject matter, and who will my story affect, regarding the ‘real’ characters in my stories?
  • By telling a truth that involves other people in the story, we have to be careful with descriptions and identities to avoid getting sued.
  • We don’t have the luxury to ‘alter’ a character in our story because that would be distorting the truth. So if that character has exhibited bad behavior, which is often a feature in our nonfiction/memoir stories, we have to take care how we present those people, leaving us having to be creatively truthful about exhibiting some of their most despicable behaviors.

 

I believe there are more barriers for nonfiction writers. Whether writing about characters or in an informative  self-help nonfiction book, the author must speak truth, and facts must be varifiable. Anything left unchecked or untruthful, will certainly create pushback on the author.

On the other hand, writing fiction allows for a lot more room for creativity, but it still must be a coherent telling and the actions and scenery must depict the setting. A good example of keeping the story flowing accurately is a story I remember reading about a long time ago, regarding the importance of continuity. I’d read that when the movie Ben Hur was being filmed, someone had caught a man wearing a wrist watch in one huge crowded scene – not a good look while wearing a toga. Well, it’s not hard to figure out nobody had watches back in those biblical times so this was a major faux pas. But it’s a good example of little incidental things that may go unchecked and can hinder a story from keeping real and true to the time period the story reflects.

So in summation, in reply to Diana’s comment where she expressed that it is easier to write fiction, I don’t exactly agree with that because to produce a good story, having all the elements tie in, writing engaging characters, and not to mention, worldbuilding, I should think it is an equally intense task writing for fiction writers too. Every genre requires research whether it’s fantasy, historical or literary fiction, or nonfiction. It’s a lot of work to write a book – any book, as all us authors here know. So as much as I appreciate Diana’s nod to nonfiction, I’m nodding right back at her.

 

What do you peeps have to say? Do you think writing in any one particular genre is more difficult than another?

 

Original post from Diana for reference https://mythsofthemirror.com/2021/01/19/when-characters-mutiny/comment-page-1/#comment-80280

 

©DGKaye2021

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You Write Like? – I Write Like? #Blogging Fun for Writers

What a fun thing to do for writers. My friend Vashti Q had tagged me in a tweet to join in the fun on Twitter and click on a link to an app – ‘I Write Like’, where you then paste a paragraph of your writing in the app and it tell’s you who your writing is like by analyzing word choice and writing style.

 

Wow

 

So cool! I told Vashti, I’d done this once before a few years ago in another app and it said I write like David Foster Wallace ( I have it on one of my side widgets). So, I hopped on again out of curiosity. Then for good measure, I did it again with another piece of writing. Below is what I got and have also added proudly to my sidebar. And if you’re wondering what Vashti got – H.G. Wells!

 

Source: You write like Margaret Atwood

 

Source: You write like Arthur Conan Doyle – I Write Like

 

So what do you think about these two depictions of my writing? Do you think there’s any kind of a melding between these 2 famous writers? I mean, let’s face it, in this world now, we’d be talking about a monumental task for Sherlock Holmes if he were tasked with solving the crimes of The Handmaid’s Tale with their takeover of America by its own government by changing the occupied parts into the new Gilead. Sounds ominous. That would be a great book, if it weren’t so close to reality. But other than that I don’t get the connection.

 

Have any of you tried this yet while you were here? Try it, I Write Like and share in comments!

 

©DGKaye