Book reviews by D.G. Kaye
Appreciation,  Conflicted Hearts,  D.G. Kaye,  D.G. Kaye books,  Goodreads,  Gratitude,  Great information,  Memoir writing,  P.S. I Forgive You,  Reading,  Relationships,  Reviews,  Sunday book review,  Twenty Years: After "I Do",  Words We Carry

Sunday Book Review – New Reviews for D.G. Kaye Books – #Memoir – #Nonfiction

Welcome to my Sunday Book Review(s). Every Sunday I share a review of a book I’ve recently read, but due to the full moon and Mercury Retrograde soon approaching, as usual, it’s interrupting my life. With that said, and in all fairness, I am also currently reading 3 books simultaneously, which I’m blaming for the cause of not finishing a book this week. In lieu of my missing review I’m sharing a few reviews I found for my own books that I’d like to share here today. I hope you enjoy.

reading books

 

 

Twenty Years: After “I Do”

Twenty Years by D.G. Kaye

 

My rating:
Twenty Years: After “I Do”
by

7365405

James‘s review Feb 02, 2020

It was amazing.

Twenty Years: After “I Do” is an autobiographical non-fiction book about the author’s experience with marriage and relationships. I’ve previously read another of her autobiographies about her relationship with her mother, and it was such an emotionally charged and well-written book, I decided to keep reading more from her every few months until I caught up on all her works.

In this one, Debby tells us what happened almost twenty years ago when she debated whether to marry the man who is now her husband. Given he was twenty years older, she had a lot of decisions to consider when it came to how her life would change. At the core of this book, and her approach to life, is her commitment and honesty in all that she achieves. Debby knew… if she married him, she would have to accept all that came with it in the future. From there, she dives into key aspects of married life: emotions, sex life, personal time, separation of couple and individual, fighting, decision-making, and death. Lessons we all need to consider.

Debby’s writing style is simply fantastic. It’s easy to devour in a short sitting, but it always makes you feel like part of her life. She openly shares so much (the good, the bad, and the ugly) while holding back in all the appropriate areas to allow for proper balance, e.g. we learn about the impacts to her sex life when one partner is ill but she doesn’t go into the details. She tells us how she and her husband tackled the issues from a day-to-day perspective and moved on… because they loved one another (to the moon and back).

There is a refreshing honesty and truth in her words, and readers will quickly find themselves a path to compare their own lives to that of the author’s. What have I done well? What could I do better? What needs to change? Excellent questions to consider, but Debby doesn’t directly tell us to do this–her actions show us why this is at the core of a good marriage. I’m thrilled I had the chance to read this one today. Although I’ve only been with my partner for 8 years, it’s easy to track where things are and what we could do differently.

Debby bravely tells us her story, allowing us to interpret for ourselves what everything means, especially in this ever-changing world where people live longer and have access to more things but it’s harder to get them. I highly recommend this book to nearly anyone in a relationship, or those who want to know how to handle one when they are. Debby shares a few secrets, some hints, and a few suggestions to consider. It’s not just for newbies or long-term couples… there’s a bit of everything for how to co-exist and still be who you are. Great work!

 

Conflicted Hearts

Conflicted Hearts, D.G. Kaye

 

Customer Review

Miriam Hurdle
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Insight from a Painful ExperienceReviewed in the United States on March 5, 2020

In her book Conflicted Hearts, Kaye recounted her vivid memories of painful experience growing up with a narcissist mother whose interest was partying, smoking, gambling and getting male’s attention to herself. Her mother threw out her father frequently and had male companions in the house with the children’s presence. Kaye’s father returned home long enough to make babies but had no guarantee to stay. She felt sad for her father. She couldn’t concentrate at school. Instead, she expected the disappearance of her father or anger from her mother. She did not receive the nurturing needed for a happy childhood. Instead of being a child, she felt responsible and be the parent to her father. Later, she found out that the paternal grandparents didn’t like her because her mother was pregnant with her and caused her parents’ marriage. She felt it was her fault, and that she was the reason for her father to marry her mother. She considered herself as the black sheep, the accident. If her father married someone else, he would have been happier. Her mother was never home and had babysitter watching the four children until Kaye was twelve and became a babysitter.

Aunty Sherry was the only adult to show her guidance, concern and attention. Sherry got married in her forties and didn’t have children.

Kaye moved to an apartment at age eighteen. She went to university part-time studying classical music and singing, but never made it. She then supported herself by working in the Casinos dealing cards. During those years, Kaye had relationships with married men. Eventually she married a loving, thoughtful husband. Eventually she got married to a love and caring husband.

As a mother and a grandmother, I couldn’t imagine such a person as Kaye’s self-centered mother. I felt horrified when Kaye’s baby brother wandered off a mile away while the mother was asleep late in the morning recovering from the late-night party. Children are the ones who suffer the most in a dysfunctional home. Kaye’s parents had problems with their marriage, yet four babies were brought into the world. I feel that Kaye’s mother had sex for pleasure and didn’t understand the consequence. Kaye should never feel responsible for causing the parents to get married. Regardless, Kaye became a sensitive person and led a happy life.

 

Conflicted Hearts, D.G. Kaye

 

Pete Springer

Reviewed in the United States on February 2, 2020

Format: Kindle Edition

P.S. I Forgive You

P.S. I Forgive You

 

Customer Review

E Tyler

Reviewed in the United States on February 6, 2020

I see that other reviewers have talked about this book as a “story.” And that is true—there is certainly a story, a true one, woven through these pages. But this is not a novel, nor did I read it simply as a memoir. I think what I appreciated the most, in fact, is that the author is not trying to be literary. She is not trying to move in a chronological flow with a traditional arc. She isn’t even trying to teach or encourage people to do this or that based on what she herself has experienced. Like a personal journal, this book is not prettied-up for the sake of onlookers. Reflections wind their way between now, not long ago, childhood, then back to the present. Some thoughts resurface throughout the book, as the author struggles again with something she thought she’d already packed safely away. It’s a rare glimpse into rawness and vulnerability, with no other goal but honesty. So on one hand, yes, it is a story—one that will invoke empathy in any reader, just as a novel might, though its characters may be disparate from the reader. Yet for those who have, in fact, lived a similar experience, I believe this book will, without ever suggesting solutions, allow many to begin or continue their own process of acknowledgment, grieving—and ultimately letting go.
One person found this helpful.

It is my belief that every woman on the planet should read this non-fiction inspirational story that reveals the negative self-esteem experiences that many if not all women encounter during various incidents throughout their lives, and the consequences of those experiences often begin in early childhood.

D.G. Kaye writes with empathy, compassion, and a plethora of knowledge using her own experiences to help other women understand the importance of realizing their sense of self that is intimately associated with our self-worth. Self-worth is not a vanity and it not excessive pride. It is how we access our own sense of being, of who we are.

The author, D.G. Kaye, writes with a warmhearted conversational style that beautifully eliminates dogma and in effect the judging of us, by us, and others for what we may perceive as a failure to have fallen victim to ridicule, to embarrassment, and instead we begin to believe in our personalities and our value in the world.

Our society often appears to judge women by our appearance: a cultural sense of what beauty is, a person’s station in life, and least but not last – money. If as a child we experienced being bullied, laughed at, ignored, and ridiculed, our self-worth without a positive, loving alternative from your parents, grandparents, and siblings—is damaged and our chances of feeling unlovable, inadequate, and homely take root in our psyche. A psyche that is damaged presents difficulties in our self-expression, our personalities, and our ability to thrive in the world without a sense of inadequacy. This sense of inadequacy leaves us open to being further damaged by others.

D.G. Kaye, the author, encourages us, helps us to understand, and presents a rationale that can and does present a newer, healthier view of ourselves as well as to develop healthier relationships. Once we rid ourselves of negativity, jealousy, envy, and that awful feeling of inadequacy; our inner personalities, our joy of life, and a sense of inner happiness will begin to shine.

D.G. Kaye’s inspirational non-fiction for women is the best of its kind that I have ever read, and a must read for all women. I give this book a 5-star rating.

 

Books by D.G. Kaye

 

 

 

Thanks for reading, feel free to visit my Amazon Author Page to view all my books.

 

©DGKaye2020

 

 

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D.G. Kaye is a nonfiction/memoir writer, who writes from her own life experiences and self-medicates with a daily dose of humor.

32 Comments

    • dgkaye

      Oh thanks so much Judith. I will always remember your review and how much you took from my book. I am halfway through your newest and loving it! <3

  • Hilary Melton-Butcher

    Hi Debby – I’m sure your books will really help many … having read the reviews and other posts on the books they open doors to thoughts I’ve known about, but not thankfully had to consider for myself … take care and anyone needing some advice I’m sure will find some answers within. You’ve had a tough life – but now you’re in good hands with a sensible head on your shoulders. Stay safe – Hilary

  • Pete Springer

    What I look for the most in any memoir is that the writing is authentic and that the writer isn’t afraid to bare their soul. We all have our faults and things in our lives that we feel less than proud of, but when you write with honesty, readers are going to identify. You did that so much with Conflicted Hearts and P.S. I Forgive You. I wish you continued success with all of your books.

  • Lauren Scott

    Congrats on all these great reviews, Debby! I have not read your books, but I think I’ll start with Twenty Years After I do. It intrigued me because of the age difference between you and your husband. Before I met my hubby, I was in a relationship with a man twenty years older, as well. But then organically, I met my husband and 31 years later, we still like and love each other. 🙂 So, things didn’t work out with the other guy, but he was a good man. For us, though, because of the different stages of life, neither of us was willing to budge in some ways to make it work. I now know it was for the best, but back then it was heartbreaking. Anyway, I look forward to reading about you! Congrats again! xo

    • dgkaye

      Wow, thanks so much Lauren for sharing some of yourself here. Funny how life works out isn’t it? I’m stoked you’re interested in Twenty Years: After “I Do”. Knowing what I do about you, I have no doubts you will relate to at least – parts of that book. I do look forward to hearing your thoughts after you’ve read. Thanks again Lauren <3

  • Sue Dreamwalker

    ALL wonderful reviews Debby and deservedly so…. I am looking forward to reading Conflicted Hearts.. I was so excited when it arrived.. I so couldn’t read three on the go at once.. lol.. I am reading a thick book at the moment a neighbour lent me which I have had on the go for a few weeks picking it up and putting it down…. It is called The Butterfly Room by Lucinda Riley… What with that knitting painting and the Plot and home garden….. and my blog… Lol…. I must remember to breatheeee LOL….
    Sending LOVE and Huge Hugs…..
    Sue <3 🙂

    • dgkaye

      You are just lovely! Again, thank you for your interest in my book, and yet even in paperback!!!! And yes, breatheeeeeeeeee, we must remember to take in the big ones! And now of course, I’m running over to Amazon to check out that big book you’re currently reading! Thank you Sue. Hugs and more hugs your way! <3 <3 xxx

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