#WATWB – Toronto Carpenter is Building Insulated Shelters for the Homeless – Goodnet

It’s that time of the month again, WATWB – the last Friday of the month, and time to share a good deed going on in the world to celebrate goodness and deflect from the negativity in the world for the We are the World Blogfest.

Today once again, I’m thrilled to share this initiative I came across, happening again in my own city of Toronto, where a carpenter, Khaleel Seivwright, has put his skills to work to build tiny shelters for the homeless. With our cold Canadian winter already taking effect, and the numerous amount of growing homeless growing with the evictions taking place in this pandemic, sadly, we can expect more of the same.  But Khaleel has started a Gofundme to raise monies to continue to build these shelters – fully insulated, complete with a window and a door.

As much as I appreciate people like Khaleel and his efforts, it’s a sad situation to know people are homeless, but somewhat of a comfort to learn that they won’t freeze to death. Read on to learn more about this endeavor.

 

Toronto Carpenter is Building Insulated Shelters for the Homeless

 

Winter is almost here and in Canada, that means very cold weather. It also means bundling up outdoors and staying indoors more. Nothing is more relaxing than drinking hot cocoa by a fireplace and watching the snow falling outside.

But for people who don’t have homes to warm up in, Canadian winters can be treacherous. That’s why Khaleel Seivwright, a carpenter in Toronto is building and giving away tiny portable shelters to people who are homeless according to CTV News.

He told CTV that he wanted to build “something that would be useful for people that are staying outside this winter.” He knows they work because he built the first one for himself a few years ago in British Columbia and it kept him warm in -15 degrees Celsius. Seivwright has already dropped off two shelters.

The tiny shelters are built of wood, insulated with home insulation and have a door and a window. They have caster wheels to make them portable and each one has a smoke detector to keep occupants safe. There is just enough room for a person to lie down in it. Each of the homes cost around $1,000 to build. . .

Please continue reading on Goodnet

Video is courtesy of CBC.ca news

 

Advocates warn of ‘catastrophic’ winter

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/mobile-shelters-homelessness-covid

 

Source: Toronto Carpenter is Building Insulated Shelters for the Homeless – Goodnet

 

If you’d like to hop on to the WATWB share with a post of your own, you can add your link to our Facebook group page HERE. Hosts for this month are: Lizbeth Hartz, Inderpreet Uppal, Shilpa Garg, Damyanti Biswas, and Roshan Radhakrishnan

There will be no December posting, so I’d like to wish all participants happy and safe holidays.

 

©DGKaye2020

bitmo live laugh love

 

#WATWB – We Are The World Blogfest -Human #Kindness Projects

We Are The World Blogfest

We are the World Blogfest

 

It’s the last Friday of the month, which means it’s #WATWB time to share something inspirational about good deeds going on around the world to focus on positive happenings, deflecting some of the negativity in the world.

 

Sometimes the smallest of gestures can mean the world to someone. Today I’m sharing The Human Kindness Project, a Toronto based community kindness program for students where participating in various projects by kids in schools focus on various random acts of kindness which don’t require a lot of time or planning, but have the ability to make someone’s day.

These acts of kindness are performed by students, and there are different acts of kindness performed for different groupings of tasks for elementary, middle and high school students.

 

Elementary School Students

  • Wave hello to a crossing guard
  • Sit next to someone at lunch who you don’t usually talk to
  • Start a conversation with a new student or with a classmate who seems lonely etc.
  • Smile at 7 people
  • Pick up a piece of garbage and throw it away
  • Say “Thank you” to a crossing guard
  • Think of something good you did today and pat yourself on the back

Middle School Students

  • Ask students to perform an act of kindness for someone who helps them (e.g. cafeteria worker, teacher, crossing guard) and then write an essay describing their experience. They should include how it made them feel and the reaction of the person who received the kindness
  • Choose a story with a kindness theme and read it aloud or individually. Discuss or write about how the characters felt when they did something nice or had something nice done for them
  • Ask students to pick someone who has done something nice for them and write a thank you note (example: a tutor for helping them learn math facts, a nurse for bandaging an injury, etc.)
  • Slip a gratitude note in your friend’s backpack
  • Write a gratitude card and give it to someone who works at the school
  • Swap one of your unhealthy snacks for a healthy snack
  • Draw a picture and give it to someone you don’t know
  • Carry your friend’s books or bag to class
  • Learn to say “Hello” and “Thank you” in a new language (that someone speaks at your school)

Read more . . .

Wherever there is a human being; there is an opportunity for kindness

— Lucius Annaeus Seneca

 

If you’d like to join into the #WATWB you can add your link to your post HERE. Your cohosts for this month are: Simon FalkAndrea MichaelsShilpa GargSylvia SteinBelinda Witzenhausen

 

 

Source: Human Kindness Projects — The Human Kindness Project