Writing as Therapy – Releasing our Thoughts on Paper

Writing to Release

 

Writing to Release

 

We use our writing to convey our thoughts, ideas, and to tell stories. For many of us, writing is a personal outlet to communicate our feelings and opinions. Writing can be a therapeutic exercise, enabling us to release what may be stifling our well-being,  offering us freedom to release our locked up emotions onto paper.

An abundance of articles and books have been written on helpful methods to release our inner turmoil. Using methods such as writing a letter to ourselves or directly to someone whom we feel we need to express our thoughts and feelings about circumstances that plague us internally is an excellent release. I’ve used this method on several occasions, beginning in my childhood, going straight into my adult years before I even realized the value of the therapeutic benefits.

Many of us have issues with confronting people with our personal feelings and need an outlet to release these feelings within, whether they be feelings of angst or affection. As a child growing up in a dysfunctional home environment, I often wanted to confront my mother about my feelings and opinions, but never mustered the courage to do so.

I began writing letters to her. After writing each one of them, I felt as though a great burden had been lifted off of my sub-conscience just by getting my feelings out of my head and onto the paper. I never sent her any of them.

Whether we are introverts or extroverts, at times, we all harbor thoughts that plague us that would serve us better if we could release them. Our minds sometimes become clouded with unanswered questions, doubts, and feelings of neglect from bruised emotions. When we don’t have an outlet or ears for us to vent to, or often, the courage to confront, writing becomes the savior of our soul.

I know many of us grew up with similar fears of their parents that I had with my own mother. Having no platform to speak out  on can be disheartening, and leave long-term hurt to surmount and fester within. Our feelings of powerlessness and intimidation to approach people with our thoughts hampers our confidence levels and often our self-esteems when there is no outlet to release and have our thoughts validated or repaired by communication.

Writing became my voice to replace my fears of confrontation. It began as a child with emotional fears and continued through my earlier romantic relationships. I was uncomfortable with declaring my feelings to a partner, because it was all I’d known from childhood – afraid to speak my opinion and feelings. I found the act of writing those letters come in handy throughout those earlier relationships. I refrained from ever sending or giving one of my letters to my mother, but I learned to give them to my partners. The words I had no courage to speak out loud, spoke for me in my letters. And the right partners were the ones who responded to my words, eventually enabling me to become more comfortable and willing to express myself vocally.

Not everyone is compassionate. Not everyone wants to hear what we have to say. But when we open our heart to someone with our words and we receive positive feedback and acknowledgement, it’s a great stepping stone to opening the lines of verbal communication beginning with that person, instilling a gained confidence to speak out loud to others.

My writing has helped to free my spirit that was once stifled with fear and anxiety, holding me back from speaking my thoughts and feelings. Writing is the gift of empowerment. Whether we write letters, keep a journal of our thoughts and feelings or write complete stories, they are all effective avenues to communicate about what resides within us. Eventually, our words will connect with the appropriate receivers, and for those not open to receive . . .well, at least we’ve released our internal burden and we leave the ball in their court with a chance for them to hear what we have to say. With any luck, we’ve opened the lines of communication. We can feel lighter knowing we’ve released.