Sunday Book Review – Word Craft Prose & Poetry by Colleen Chesebro

Welcome to my Sunday Book Review. Today I’m thrilled to review Colleen Chesebro’s latest book – Word Craft Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry. If you are a lover of poetry writing, I would highly recommend this book. You’ll have to read my review below to find out why!

 

 

 

Blurb:

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

 

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

 

 

My 5 Star Review:

If you’re a lover of poetry and are interested in learning how to write syllabic poetry, or even just as a reader to discover all that’s involved in writing in the various styles of syllabic poetry, this is the book for you. Yes, there are plenty of books written on the subject for sure, but this author has a gift of born ‘teaching’. Her tutorials on how to, as well as great direction in explanations and wonderful use of examples allow us to clearly see what the author is explaining.

 

Syllabic poetry encompasses various styles and syllabic counts with succinct descriptions, from both the English and Japanese style of writing Haiku. The author explains the differences in syllabic counts to various versions of Haiku, as well as teaching us the difference between poetic prose which requires no syllabic count, such as Gogyolka or Tanka Prose. We’ll also learn about many of the various forms of Haiku and Tanka with Haibun, which styles are written from a personal point of view, and writing about nature.

 

Chesebro takes us through all the various forms of writing syllabic poetry and shares with us the importance of writing poetry, “When we create poetry, we become better writers.” She goes on to explain that we learn from poetry, the brevity of words, urging us to use stronger word choices with minimal words that evoke vivid images. A wonderful guide book to introduce us to the meaning of syllabic poetry and the differences between Japanese and American Haiku. This author runs a weekly poetry challenge that I urge anyone interested in learning to write poetry from the basics and forward to visit her blog.

 

©DGKaye2021

 

Sunday Book Review – Poetry Treasures – Anthology

Welcome to my Sunday Book Review. Today I’m reviewing Poetry Treasures, a colloboration of entries from some talented poets in our writing community. This is a short and sweet read with a delicious sampling of various poems written in various forms, and an in-depth introduction to the poets.

 

 

Blurb:

A collection of poetry from the poet/author guests of Robbie Cheadle on the “Treasuring Poetry” blog series on Writing to be Read in 2020. Open the book and discover the poetry treasures of Sue Vincent, Geoff Le Pard, Frank Prem, Victoria (Tori) Zigler, Colleen M. Chesebro, K. Morris, Annette Rochelle Aben, Jude Kitya Itakali, and Roberta Eaton Cheadle.

 

My 4 Star Review:

A sweet short read and a collaboration of a variety of poems written in various forms of poetry by some talented poets. I feel like this book was an introduction to the poets as well as a sampling of their creativity in poetry. I especially enjoyed the poetry of Colleen Chesebro and a delicious sampling of intrinsic poetry by the talented and missed, the late, Sue Vincent.

@DGKaye2021

 

 

Sunday Book Review – New Book on the Shelves and #Review – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen M. Chesebro | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to my Sunday Book Review. If you’ve read my yesterday post, you’ll learn that I’m overwhelmed between grief and busyness – getting ready to move. Also, because I’ve been on a rip-roaring tangent of reading many books from grief to afterlife, and often, reading two books at once, I don’t have a review of my own written yet, so today’s book review is a reblog of Sally Cronin’s recent shining new review for Colleen Chesebro’s newest labor of love – Word Craft – Prose and Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry. If you enjoy either reading and/or writing poetry, you may want to expand your horizons and learn about the various styles of writing syllabic poetry.

 

Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves and #Review – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen M. Chesebro

 

 

As a participant in Colleen Chesebro’s weekly Tuesday Tanka Challenge, I have discovered so many different forms of syllabic poetry and come to love creating poems in these formats. I am delighted to share the news of Colleen’s new release and also my release for the guide.

 

 

Blurb:

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

 

Sally Cronin’s 5 Star review for the guide and poetry collection May 19th 2021

I have enjoyed poetry from childhood and would write stories in verse from an early age. I was introduced to Japanese syllabic poetry when I began participating in Colleen Chesebro’s Weekly Tanka Challenge three years ago. At first hesitantly, but then as my confidence grew under her tutelage, I became more adventurous.

Word Craft: Prose and Poetry shares an expanded guide to the various forms of syllabic verse shared on the author’s website, and includes the history and provenance of the traditional and more modern versions. It is fascinating and also humbling that we are in this day and age, creating poetry with such a lineage.

This guide reminded me of how much I still have to learn about the intent of each form and their accepted applications. Nature and the self are prominent, but in some there is a freedom to express emotion, irony and humour. Most forms tell a story and the challenge is to do so with sometimes as few as seventeen syllables and within the framework of the format.

I was very honoured to have some of my challenge pieces included with the talented poets who have participated, and whose poetry brings such pleasure to those who read it in the challenge recap… and that includes the author who always explains the intricacies of a particular form then shows with examples for even beginners to follow.

I recommend this guide and collection for all lovers of poetry who will enjoy the poems shared throughout the book, beginners who are looking for a way to express themselves with brevity, and more experienced poets who are looking for a new challenge. For me as a writer of short stories and novels, writing syllabic poetry has been a great way to learn how to make a few words convey more.

 

Visit Colleen’s Amazon Author Page for a list of all her books.

 

Visit Sally’s blog for the full post

 

Original Source: Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves and #Review – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen M. Chesebro | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

 

©DGKaye2021

 

CarrotRanch RODEO #2: DOUBLE ENNEAD SYLLABIC POETRY – Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry

 

Colleen Chesebro ran a Double Ennead TUFF Poetry Challenge for Charli Mills’ annual Rodeo for the CarrotRanch writing contests. This was a difficult poetry challenge with lots of criteria involved. I hopped on this one.

 

 

Welcome to the Carrot Ranch Rodeo! This challenge is sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community at carrotranch.com and run by lead Buckaroo, Charli Mills.

Almost everyone knows my love for syllabic poetry; especially haiku, tanka, cinquain, and more. Woo HOO! I’ve got something special wrangled up for this challenge!

For this year’s rodeo, I’ve created a special form called the Double Ennead. The word Ennead means nine, and a double nine is ninety-nine! Carrot Ranch is famous for 99-word flash fiction. Now, the ranch has its own syllabic poetry form written in 99 syllables!

The Double Ennead comprises five lines with a syllable count of 6/5/11/6/5, (33 SYLLABLES per stanza) 3 STANZAS EACH = 99 SYLLABLES, NO MORE, NO LESS!

 

CRITERIA:

 

* The Double Ennead features three stanzas of five lines, each with a syllable count of 6/5/11/6/5, totaling 99 syllables, no more—no less. Count your syllables. Read the instructions carefully.

* For syllable and line count use: writerlywords.com. Your poem does not have to have a western theme. It can be in any genre, and can include any tone or mood. However, it must have a title. Punctuation and rhyming are optional and up to the poet.

For this challenge, your poem must include five words taken from the found-poem by Cowboy Poet, Charles Badger Clark, called “The Springtime Plains.” You must use the fives words you choose in the order you found them in one of the three stanzas.

The word placement also depends on the line. Pay attention to the placement of these words in your poem.

  1. Line 1 starts with word 1
  2. Line 2 ends with word 2
  3. Line 3 starts with word 3
  4. Line 4 ends with word 4
  5. Line 5 starts with word 5

* Submit your five consecutive words from the poem “The Springtime Plains” so the judges can determine the placement of your words. Specify which stanza contains the five words.

* Make the judges remember your syllabic poem long after reading it.

 

“The Springtime Plains,”

by Charles Badger Clark

 

Heart of me, are you hearing

The drum of hoofs in the rains?

Over the Springtime plains I ride

Knee to knee with Spring

And glad as the summering sun that comes

Galloping north through the zodiac!

Heart of me, let’s forget

The plains death white and still,

When lonely love through the stillness called

Like a smothered stream that sings of Summer

Under the snow on a Winter night.

Now the frost is blown from the sky

And the plains are living again.

Lark lovers sing on the sunrise trail,

Wild horses call to me out of the noon,

Watching me pass with impish eyes,

Gray coyotes laugh in the quiet dusk

And the plains are glad all day with me.

Heart of me, all the way

My heart and the hoofs keep time,

And the wide, sweet winds from the greening world

Shout in my ears a glory song,

For nearer, nearer, mile and mile,

Over the quivering rim of the plains,

Is the valley that Spring and I love best

 Poemhunter.com

EXAMPLE of how to write the Double Ennead:

Line 1 starts with word 1 = wild

Line 2 ends with word 2 = horses

Line 3 starts with word 3 = call

Line 4 ends with word 4 = to

Line 5 starts with word 5 = me

Double Ennead: Five lines, with a syllable count of 6/5/11/6/5, 33 syllables per stanza, 3 stanzas each = 99 syllables.

 

~ ~ ~

 

The five consecutive words I selected: “Shout in my ears a” used in the first stanza.

 

 

A Pitiful Plague

 

Shout loud at what it is.

Words and actions in

My head ring clear of the assault on mankind.

Open your eyes and ears.

A call for kindness.

Stifling in ignorance,

Poison fills the mind.

This hate virus infects and sheds viral ash.

Soil, rinse, spin, and again,

The story repeats.

The cure for this madness,

Some will fail to learn,

Only love and kind words can conquer this plague.

For a fresh breath of life –

Love thy fellow man.

©DGKaye2020

 

Source: Carrot RODEO #2: DOUBLE ENNEAD SYLLABIC POETRY – Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry

 

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