#WATWB – Inspirational Post – One Word – Andrew Joyce

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#WATWB Inspirational Post

We are the World Blogfest

 

 

Every last Friday of the month #WATWB – We are the World Blogfest offers writers to contribute an inspirational post to focus on some of the good in the world. As my month has been chaotic with my husband’s health issues, I’m late in putting a post together so I’ve decided to share an inspirational story written by author Andrew Joyce, It only takes one word to change your life around. Read this heartwarming story to find out ‘the word’.

 

If you’d like to join in the blogfest, you can add your posts to the Linky addon after the post.

 

One Word

I’ve been angry all my life. Everyone was always out to take from me. I’ve never had any friends. Even when I was in high school, the other kids would go out to lunch together while I sat by myself, just off the school grounds, and felt the loneliness that had become my life.

On Saturdays nights, the other kids would go out on dates or pile into a car for a night of adventure. I would hitchhike to the main drag, plant myself on a bus bench, and watch the world go by, wishing I was a part of it.

Things didn’t get much better after I became an adult. I existed in the world, but was not a part of it. I had no use for anybody. My loneliness had long ago morphed into hatred. Hatred for the whole damn human race.

Then one day, I saw a dirty beggar down on 8th Street, by the 7-Eleven. I took great joy in his miserableness. At least someone was worse off than me. There was no way that he could have any friends. He was both lonely and homeless. I, on the other hand, had a roof over my head.

I tarried to revel in the spectacle. I was enjoying myself.

He held out a plastic cup, imploring me to contribute. Was he joking? Could he not tell from my sneer what I thought of him?

I was turning to leave, when a well-dressed man came up to the beggar and grabbed his filthy hand. He shook it vigorously while saying, “How ya doing, Tim?”

“Not too bad, Jim. Not too bad,” answered the tramp.

“You know, me and the wife still have that room for you. It would do you good to get off the streets and have a decent meal every day. If you’d ever accept one of my invitations to dinner, you’d see what a good cook Ruth is.”

“Thanks. But I’m doing just fine … for now. Let me take a rain check on that. Okay?”

“Sure, Tim. Sure.”

Before he left, the man took out his wallet, extracted a five-dollar bill, and put it into the cracked plastic cup held by the beggar.

I just shook my head in disbelief, turned, and walked into the 7-Eleven to get my cigarettes and a few scratch-offs.

When I came out, the beggar was in an animated conversation with a well-dressed, good-looking woman. I figured that he was harassing her and decided right then and there to go to her aid, if for no other reason than to harass the tramp.

“Excuse me, ma’am. But is this man bothering you?”

She looked at me as though I had two heads. Then she started to laugh.

“My God, no! It’s the other way around.” She turned to the beggar and said, “Tim, would you like this gentleman to intercede on your behalf?”

The beggar smiled and answered, “It’s alright. He’s a friend of mine. And he knows how I get around beautiful women. He was just trying to protect you from my lustful ways.”

It took a moment, but finally the woman broke into a big grin and said, “Tim McCarthy, if you aren’t the living end. Okay, we’ll finish this discussion later. But I’m going to get you into a decent place to live if it’s the last thing I ever do.” She dug into her purse and came out with a twenty and into the cup it went. She then wrapped her arms around that disgusting person and gave him a long, tight hug. She patted my hand before she left, saying, “You make sure to take care of our Timmy.”

I have to admit, as she strutted away, I was thinking what a great-looking ass she had.

I was brought out of my thoughts by, “She really knows how to swing that thing to hold a man’s interest.”

It was the beggar.

Okay. Hold the goddamn train. Apply the brakes. What the hell was going on? I tore my eyes away from the rapidly retreating woman and confronted the beggar.

“Please tell me … what is it with you? Why do those people associate with you?”

The tramp smiled and asked if I minded if we walked as we talked. He had an engagement and did not want to be late. I shrugged. As long as he didn’t get too close to me as we walked, I had nothing else to do. I was glad I was not on the lee as we walked. The wind kept the stench at bay.

I opened the conversation by asking, “Why did you tell that woman I was a friend of yours? I’ve never seen you before.”

He winked at me, took a few dollars out of his cup, and handed them to a homeless man as we passed by. Not a word was spoken by either man.

Finally, he said, “Even though we have never met, I consider you a friend. I mean, here you are, accompanying me to my luncheon appointment.”

“I’m walking with you to get an answer to my question. I’m no friend of yours. So, tell me. Why do these well-off citizens treat you like a long-lost friend?”

We passed another homeless person and, again, he dipped into his cup and shared his bounty.

I had to know. “Why are you giving away the money that you spent hours begging for?”

“It’s only paper with green ink on it. It doesn’t mean that much to me.”

“Then why do you stand on the street and beg for it?” I had him there. Or so I thought.

“I do it to meet people. Like I met you this morning. I think we’re going to be good friends.”

“You do, do you? I can’t stand your smell, I can’t stand being around you. I think I’ve gone as far as I want with you. I don’t care why people like you. It has no bearing on my life. Forget that I even asked why. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have a life to live.”

“What kind of life?”

That stopped me in my tracks. I turned back and took stock of the slight, skinny, disheveled man who stood before me. With contempt in every syllable, I said, “A hell of a better life than you’re living or are ever apt to live.” I was so proud of myself.

He smiled. “Please have lunch with me. It’s my treat.”

I was taken aback. “What restaurant is gonna let you in?” I mocked.

He held up his right index finger and simply said, “I got a place.”

Strange as it seems, I was starting to warm to the guy. I had hit him with my best insults and none of them bothered him. At the moment, I was unemployed and had the entire day to kill before my nighttime TV shows came on, so for the second time since I met the dude, I shrugged my shoulders and decided to go with the flow.

“Okay. As long as you can find a restaurant that will seat you—and you’re paying—I’ll have lunch with you.” I thought it a safe bet. No one was going to let him through the front doors of any establishment, let alone a restaurant. Continue reading . . .

 

Guest hosts for this week’s #WATWB are   Shilpa GargSimon FalkLynn HallbrooksEric LahtiDamyanti Biswas andGuilie Castillo. Please link to them in your WATWB posts and go say hi!

 

If you’d like to add an inspirational share for this month’s contribution, you can click HERE to do so.

Source: One Word – Andrew Joyce

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31 Comments

Add a Comment
  1. Thank you Deb for sharing this amazing story…I am off to read more 🙂

    1. Thanks for reading Balroop. I know you will just love this story. 🙂 xx

  2. Hi Debby – I’ve been over to read more .. what an amazing story – such a delight. Incredible … now I must go and find out more about Mr Joyce … thanks so much for introducing us to Tim … cheers Hilary

    1. You are welcome Hilary. I think you’ll enjoy Andrew’s writing. 🙂

  3. That’s a great one! I’m late too. Will get my WATWB up tomorrow or Sunday at the latest.

    1. Thanks John. I know I broke the rules with the 500 word count, but sometimes rules need to be broken. 🙂 I look forward to yours. 🙂

  4. I’m hooked. I’m clicking over to read more.

  5. I love this story Debby.. great share… ♥

    1. Thanks Sal. Isn’t just a beautiful story! <3 xxx

  6. Debby, Andrew’s story is just wonderful, and so beautifully told. Thank you so much for sharing it. Yes, you broke the 500 word limit, but we didn’t have to keep reading if we didn’t want to. I couldn’t stop, I needed to find out what happened. I’ll be going back for more of Andrew’s writing. If there are more like this, they are worth every tap of the keyboard, unless like you he also writes freehand. 🙂 What joy you both have brought to readers and the world through sharing this story.

    1. Thanks so much Norah. I was concerned about the word count, but when I needed a story and wasn’t prepared for this month’s challenge, I knew I was saving this reblog in my drafts and found it so appropriate for #WATWB because there is only one word isn’t there? <3
      So glad you enjoyed. And yes Andrew is a fantastic and powerful writer. 🙂

      1. Indeed he is. I’m pleased you had nothing else organised and shared this one. 🙂

        1. Always good to keep some posts in the draft archives! 🙂

          1. Definitely! 🙂

  7. Thank you so much Debby for sharing that amazing story from Andrew I went over to say how much I enjoyed and so much I too wish to share it with his permission..
    Love and HUGS dear friend xxx <3

    1. I knew you would love it. Isn’t it just a beautiful story! <3 <3

      1. Hi Debby, yes, Loved it and shared it 🙂 So thank you! 🙂

        1. So glad Sue! <3 :) ;) xx

  8. What an amazing story. Thanks much for sharing this with us 🙂

    1. Thanks for visiting Shilpa. 🙂

  9. This is such a beautiful story!! Thank you for sharing Andrew’s link here so I could read it in full. Wow. LOVE is the answer. Yes.

    1. So glad you went over to read it all Christy. I thought it was such a beautiful story, definitely a good message for the #WATWB <3

  10. I’m with Christy, Debby. Wow! I so loved that story. You have not taken an easy option at all. Such a story runs to the heart of WATWB. I do hope your husband is improving a bit. Thanks for sharing Andrew’s story, for all of us who get angry and need to meet Tim. Thanks for all you do for our WATWB community.

    1. Hi Simon. Thanks for popping by. Glad you liked the story. I think it moves anyone who reads it. Great lesson! Thank you. 🙂

  11. Such a soul touching, inspiring story! Thanks for sharing the love.
    I’m following Andrew’s blog now as well. 🙂

    1. How wonderful Natalie. Andrew is a prolific writer. I know you’ll enjoy his blog. 🙂 xx

  12. Talk about an inspiring story, Debby!! Thank you so much for re-posting and sharing.

    1. So glad you enjoyed. Seems to resonate with many. Powerful story, especially in today’s world. 🙂 x

  13. I was drawn in by this story. I went over and finished it on Mr. Joyce’s place. I shared my thoughts with him. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if there were more “souls” like Tim? Thanks for sharing this and for being a part of #WATWB.

    1. Hi Lynn. I’m glad you found it as moving as I did. The world could definitely use many more like Tim. 🙂

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